Category: Lazy Reading

Lazy Reading for 2014/04/20


This is another week where I find neat stuff at the start of the week, start the post, and by the time the post date rolls around, those links have been seen everywhere.  Yes, I’m complaining I don’t get “First Post!” the way I want.

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Heads or Tails.  Chris Ware’s comics are all about using the comic as a way of expressing the movement of time, in so many ways.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike, UNIXish     6 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/04/13


I am all over the map this week.

Your unrelated animated image of the week: a seal with hiccups.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/04/06


This is the first Lazy Reading in a while that I hadn’t already started before the previous week’s Lazy Reading was displayed.

Your unrelated comics link of the day: The Very Hungry Rust Monster.

 

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/03/30


I suddenly can’t remember if I pad my dates with zeros.

Your unrelated link of the week: The creepiest animatronic work I’ve seen yet.  (via Orbital Operations)

 

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/03/23


Aaaaaaaaa link overflow!

Your unrelated link of the week: Space Replay.  A very good use of an Arduino board.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2014/03/16


A lot of this was done early; last week had a lot of interesting stuff turn up.  Maybe because we’re coming out of a extreme winter in the northern hemisphere, and people are feeling a bit more energetic?

Your unrelated link of the week: The Conet Project, recordings of numbers stations, at the Internet Archive. (via the Orbital Operations newsletter)

Bonus timewaster: 2048.  (via multiple places)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2014/03/09


This week blew up with links fast.

Your unrelated video of the week: This trailer for Crawl.  This is a roguelike multiplayer cross-platform game, though I don’t know if it would work on BSD.  The important thing: the voiceover narration is fantastic.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/03/02


A public service announcement: Check your backup power systems when the weather is bad.  It has been so cold that the always-running heater blocks cooked away the coolant in my workplace’s backup generator in between the weekly inspections, and when the power died a few days ago, the generator failed to start.  This led to the paradoxical sensor warning: “High coolant temperature” when the outside temperature was below freezing.

Your unrelated link of the week: Muppets, NYC, and tea.  I know it’s an ad, but it fits my interests perfectly.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     3 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/02/23


Pardon me as I wander through a lot of topics.

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Top Shelf is now selling their excellent comics without DRM, so they can be stored/read however you like.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/02/16


Trivia fact that I told someone about at NYCBSDCon: the habit of using (via) to correctly attribute links comes from a still-online-but-not-functioning site called The Nonist.  The fellow putting it together had the most wonderful ability to find esoteric, interesting items to read about.  I can’t match his talent for images.  The Wayback Machine has a copy of the Nonist site so you can see it in its original glory.

To the (text-only) links!

Your unrelated link of the week: If I met you at NYCBSDCon last week, did I seem like a mature adult?  I’m not.  Here’s Deer Fart.wmv.  

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2014/02/09


A low week this week, but I have been on the road… I will hopefully have a large NYCBSDCon report up later today, to make up for a skimpy Lazy Reading.

Bit rot, circa 1998.  Enjoy looking at the old technology options and prices.  (via)

The Industrial Internet of Things.  Most of what’s out there that should be wired isn’t, and it’s because the companies making the equipment like to pretend the Internet never happened.  Also, modbus is horrifying.

Bluetooth Low Energy: what do we do with you?  I’m surprised more people aren’t excited about BLE; it has a lot of potential.

Your unrelated link of the week: a new Cyriak film!  Starts cute, ends horrifying, but that’s no surprise.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/02/02


Lots of randomness this week.  That’s great!

Your unrelated link of the week: it’s two links, for the two very rare German episodes of Monty Python’s Flying Circus.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2014/01/26


Finally, a relatively quiet week.

Writing more efficient shell scripts.

.  Piped shell commands seen as a set of relations.  This is the most analysis I’ve ever seen of a command line.  (via)  Also related.

Perl Secret Operators.  (via)

As a followup on last week’s Curse of the Leading Zero link, Thomas Klausner points out Python 3.0 explicitly stopped reading leading zeros as the prefix for octals.

The current Humble Weekly Sale (through the 31st) is all roguelikes.  Dunno how many of them run on non-Windows. though.

Mastering Vim in Vim.  Lots more ‘learning Vim’ suggestions where I found this link.

Not possible to have happen; I don’t believe it.  (via)

Your unrelated link of the week: 50 years of tape.  Cassette audio tapes, that is.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/01/19


The Internet overfloweth with good links, lately.  Nothing this week that requires a lot of reading, but plenty of things to click.  Enjoy!

Your unrelated link of the week:  Fail Forward, a collection of writing about pen and paper RPGs.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2014/01/12


There’s a lot this week, so let’s get started:

Git Reference.  Not that there isn’t a lot of other documentation out there, but much of what you find is people asking specific questions rather than explanations of procedure.  (via)

Movie Code.  At least most of these are using legit code, even if it’s often the wrong application.  It’s been worse.  (See ‘state of the art video’ item)  (via)

Unix: 14 things to do or stop doing in 2014.  These tips are actually useful and contain no buzzwords.

TrewGrip, another item in my quest for interesting keyboards I don’t use.

4043 bytes to recreate a mid-80s IBM PC.  There are less bytes of data in the program than there were transistors in the CPU that it emulates.  It can run MS Flight Simulator.  It was for the International Obfuscated C Code Contest, which should surprise you not at all.  (via)

The World’s Most Pimped-Out ZX81.  I don’t think it can run Doom, though.

The Unix Shell’s Humble If.  For once, an article that doesn’t just pretend bash is the only shell that exists.  (via)

Unix Shell RPG Tutorial.  It’s exactly what that combination of words means.  (via)

Scientists tell their favorite jokes.

Best programmer jokes, found here where there’s more.

I find these animations slightly hypnotizing.  (via)

Technology used to suck even when it was cutting-edge, and we’ll still feel that way in the future.  (via)

How did we end up with a centralized Internet?

Software in 2014.  The summary is: server side is great, client is not.  (via)

Able to be turn on, and that is it.  Sci-fi movies ignore where technology comes from.

True Nuke Puke Story.  My mine coworkers once did something similar to a copier repairman; got him so worried about going underground that he had a panic attack when he had to step on the hoist.  We had to get a new repairman.

Your unrelated link of the week: BIG ENDING FACES!  (via)

Lazy Reading for 2014/01/05


The holiday break for most people at the end of the year translated to a lot more material showing up now.  We all benefit!

The Year Megaplatforms Ruled The Internet.  Online companies aren’t ‘disruptive’ any more; they are the establishment.  That didn’t take long.  Is it a cycle?  I hope so. (via)

Intel XDK.  Should be cross-platform enough to work on DragonFly, I bet.  (via)

On Hacking MicroSD Cards.  Bunnie Huang from 30C3, so it’s in-depth.  “In reality, all flash memory is riddled with defects — without exception.”  The microcontroller on the cards is exploitable.  (via)

Speaking of 30c3, the recordings are up.  (via same place)

Bignum Bakeoff contest recap, from 2001.  512B to return the largest number possible.  (via)

Owlbears, Rust Monsters, and Bulettes, oh my!  The origin of some of the AD&D Monster Manual monsters.  (via)

The Postmodernity of Big Data.  I don’t know about the text, but I like the punchcard images.

You are going to be using IPv6, whether you are ready or not.  (via, with good discussion)

End Paper Maps.  This is ephemera that shan’t survive the Internet, I suppose – but I always did enjoy it.  (via)

Understanding the Galaga No-Fire Cheat.  I would have loved to do this as a child, but surviving 15 minutes in a coin-op video was nearly impossible, barring (for me) one strange exception.  (via)

Creative usernames and Spotify account hijacking.  (also via)

Remember, The Cloud means that even if companies last, their services may not – even if there’s no other service to replace it.  (via)

Eventually, will every program have its own internal upgrading and management code?  It seems like it.

New Year’s Resolutions for Sysadmins.  Some of these resolutions look forward, some look backward.

Mommy, why is there a server in the house?

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/12/29


Last of the year!  You’ll want to take some reading/watching time this week.

Can you be arrested for what’s on your computer?  Yes, of course.

Making SSH connections easier.  If you don’t know it, you should.

Ansible vs. Salt and Creating a new Ansible node.  BSD-focused.

Vim in the hands of a Real Maniac.  Damian Conway, the speaker, is a man of complicated skill, and a good speaker.  It gets pretty crazy by the end.  (via)

The Saddest Moment, James Mickens talking about Byzantine fault tolerance.  (via)

The via link on that last one led me to Dadhacker, with some excellent entries like this Eject button at Apple or Fuctuation.

Digital restoration and typesetter forensics.  Brian Kernighan, Ken Thompson, and Joe Condon reverse-engineering hardware because the vendor won’t reveal how it works – in the 1970s.  The letter to the vendor is hilarious.  The story of how it was recovered, also linked there, is a good read, too.  (also via)

Over-Extended Metaphor for the Day.  Could quibble, won’t.  I like the Emo Phillips followup joke quoted here, where I found it.

Oldcomputers.net.  There’s some neat old things there – and they’re selling/buying!  (via)

Console Living Room; more old game systems resurrected via JSMESS.  First reaction was that it was neat, second reaction: these old games were horrible, compared to what we have now.  (via multiple places)

exabgp, human-readable BGP messages.  (also also via)

The Grand C++ Error Explosion Competition.  I had a student who excelled at this, involuntarily.  (via)

We’ve run out of closed-source things to re-implement as open source, and now we’re reinventing the open-source wheel.

How open source changed Google – and how Google changed open source.  Their open source group is essentially about license compliance, not evangelism.  That is the way it should be.  The last paragraph about Summer of Code is spot-on.  (via)

Readers of a certain age will recognize the global vector map theme.  (Here’s more.)  It makes me think of the old Apple ][ game, NORAD.  (incidentally, I was way better at it than the player in that video.)

Your unrelated comics link of the week: not a comic, but a magazine that includes comics: Mineshaft.  I’ve heard about it many times, and I keep meaning to get a subscription.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/12/22


Still quiet out there, but I found some good reading.

PHP functions originally named for string length and sorting.  Yeesh.  (via)

A great old-timey game programming hack.  There’s an initial speed hack in this story, and then there’s another clever trick to fix memory corruption.  (via)

My hardest bug.  This was a pretty fiendish problem.  (via)

Gitdown: don’t commit when drunk.  I’ve done that.  Actually will use an Arduino-based breathalyzer.  (via)

Another Perl One-Liners review.

Zeno of Elea, a game.  It’s based on a classic… (via)

Vim plugins you should know about.  From that One-Liners author.

Speaking of Perl, here’s a Larry Wall interview.  An old-school hacker – he wrote patch, too.

Moonpig: a billing system that doesn’t suck.  An in-depth review of system design.  More Perl, too.

Three Books You Should Read…  Mostly BSD content.

How to use Tor wrong, in multiple ways.  It’s not for petty crimes, and it’s not any use when you’re using it from a monitored network.  (via)

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Cookie Puss.

Lazy Reading for 2013/12/15


Halfway to Christmas; time to buy presents if you haven’t already!

DragonFly on Hacker News.  I haven’t read through the comments fully.

The Meaning of “Doom”.  This article makes a very good point; Doom was one of the first game that encouraged user participation in the creation of the game.  Not the creation when it was first made, but the endless recreations as mods.  It’s sort of the same mechanism as open source, but as an activity and not a license.

Alphabet of the Obsolete.  Also known as “Things my children don’t know and don’t care about.”

Now is a good time to donate to the Internet Archive.  (via many places)

The Development of the C Language.  Dennis Richie was good at telling stories about some otherwise very dry subjects; his histories are enjoyable.  Maybe you have to have a certain kind of temperament or interest to really like them.  (via)

The Birth of Standard Error.  It was a smelly typesetting machine where it first started.   (via EFNet #dragonflybsd)

There’s some other interesting articles on that site, including “Programming Languages vs. Fat Fingers” and “The Importance of Being Declarative“.

Better and Better Keyboards.  Continuing the keyboard theme from previous weeks.  (via)

Building the Commodore C-128.  I never used one of these, but I’m sure there’s a few readers that will be gripped with nostalgia.  (via)

The Amiga 500 as a Chrome add-in.  Nostalgia, again.  (via)

Running 4.3BSD Quasijarus with simh VAX.  It’s apparently 4.3BSD for Vax hardware.  I did not know of this, or at least I don’t remember it.

When a Bash script asks, “Where am I?”.

Have you heard the axiom that every program grows in scope until it reads email?  It’s really all programs grow in complexity until they have their own auto-updater.  (Also, XScreenSaver is awesome.)

Vim, in Javascript.  Or maybe the axiom should be ‘Everything eventually is rewritten in Javascript’.  (via)

Did you see that interstitial?  It was dope!”  (via I forget, sorry)

Your unrelated animated gif of the week: Happy talking boat.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     3 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/12/08


Links are a bit rushed this week cause I’ve been on the road, but here you go.

explainshell – help for arbitrary shell commands.  It’s a really good idea, implemented in a pretty way.  (via)

True X-Mouse Gizmo for Windows.  I’m also saving this for later, just like the person who found this link.

From the same place: The ARPANET IMP Program: Retrospective and Resurrection.  Recreating the entire Internet, when the Internet could be summed up as a list of 5-6 locations.

How ALL CAPS and punctuation is now used to communicate mood.  Communication methods still tied down by ASCII, and then UTF-8.

I miss USENET.  (via)

A Testament to X11 Backwards Compatibility.  Watch the video at the end.   (via)

Your unrelated comics link of the week: There are more comics and illustrated works out there than there ever have been.  A decade ago, I could buy a few art comics and a reprint each month and feel like I was keeping up.  Now, it’s like a firehose of minicomic, self-published books, and prestige reprints that completely refreshes every week.  The Comics Reporter 2013 Holiday Shopping Guide is huge but barely touches on it all.  Read through and order something you aren’t familiar with; I can almost guarantee there’s several items in there you’ve never heard of.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/12/01


Now that I’m going into more descriptive detail with these, I’m going to try without the bullet points.  It’s less of a Wall Of Text that way.

Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me When I Was Learning How to Code.  Really, very good advice.  (via)

‘vr’ mentioned the Space Cadet and Symbolics Macivory keyboards in comments for last week’s Lazy Reading keyboard links.  I didn’t know what they were, so searching around found me this Symbolics keyboard image (the model itself is apparently dearly missed)and the inevitable Wikipedia Space Cadet entry.  I also found this study of keyboards that mentions some other ‘special’ modern models I’ve heard of in passing – Das Keyboard and Happy Hacking models.

Also found as part of that search: one man’s quest to get his own Lisp Machine.  That appears to be about 10 years old, so my guess is that you’d go for emulation these days.

Sorting information that isn’t quite numeric.  This bites everyone sooner or later.

The death and life of great Internet cities.  “Whatever we may ultimately make of our move towards sites like Facebook, it’s almost certainly the case that, for the average netizen, it was a movement away from online literacy.”  An excellent article about how communities are no longer built online – at least not through social networks.  (via)

Farming hard drives: 2 years and $1m later.  Data-driven analysis of hard drive prices, and how they’ve recovered poorly from the Thailand floods.  I always like it when a company takes data from doing something on a large scale – something very few people are doing or could do – and releases it.  (via)

Systems Software Research is Irrelevant.  Rob Pike pointing out how the system ecosystem was becoming monocultural.  It’s over 10 years old, so some of the problems have changed.  The interesting thing is to look at it and see which parts were identification of upcoming trends.  (via)

DragonFly 3.6 video review.  This person doesn’t realize the shell is tcsh, not bash, and it really, really messes him up.  I had to stop watching about 6 minutes in.  (via blakkheim on IRC)

Your unrelated link of the week: The Church of the Subgenius is selling 2-for-1 deals on ordainment.  It’s really a legal ordainment, too, at least in the U.S.  You can perform weddings, funerals… circumcisions?  Not sure about the legal restrictions on that, and maybe I don’t want to know.  Anyway, you get an entertaining pack of literature which you can take either completely seriously, or not at all.

 

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/11/24


There’s some in-depth items to look at this week; pull up a chair and get something warm to drink.  You will be rewarded.

  • James Mickens, who you may remember from The Slow Winter a few weeks back, has written again with The Night Watch.  Gonzo tech writing is the best.  Note to self: a ;login: subscription might not be a bad idea, as apparently there’s more like that.
  • Another note to self: watch the USENIX blog.  There’s some interesting things on there.
  • Citation Needed.   There’s a plausible claim in this that the reason we have 0-based indexing in most languages is because of yacht-racing.  Seriously, read the article, and follow some of the links in it.  (via)
  • Engelbart’s Violin.  Because “a computer system should maximally reward learning.”  Found in that previous essay; good enough I had to break it out.
  • Found in the comments from that previous link: SiWriter.  One-handed phone typing, simulating a chorded keyboard.
  • History of T.  I was wondering if it was something about tea, but no, it’s a discussion about a Lisp implementation.  Lisp all seems to originate from a magical time, when computers were faster, dragons were common, and elves hadn’t retreated across the sea yet, or at least all the stories have that mythical vibe.  See the ycominator link for additional discussion about system languages like Rust, of which I have only heard in passing so far.
  • The video and audio from LISA 2013 has been posted.  There’s lots there; I’m sure you’ll find an interesting topic.
  • I wasn’t kidding about this being a dense week for links, was I?
  • This should have been in yesterday, but I only read about it this morning: Darwin/BSD on ARM.  More ARM work everywhere, please; there’s a tidal wave of these processors washing about.  (thanks, J.C. Roberts)
  • Why I use a 20-year-old Model M keyboard.  See the ycombinator discussion for alternatives.  They all may seem expensive, but it’s equipment you’re going to smash your fingers against for many years; it should be good.
  • That discussion link in the previous item led me to this image.  An old-style Thinkpad keyboard?  Now that would be pleasant to use.  Apparently these existed, though the Lenovo keyboards section doesn’t have anything exactly by that name; the keyboards there look generic.  There’s some on eBay.  Anyone ever used one?
  • The Homebrew Computer Club reconvenes.  A computer club nowadays is “we downloaded some of the same software”, while back then it was “I built a computer.”  A bit more hardcore.
  • chibitronics.  It’s ‘circuit stickers’, and a good idea.
  • mattext, a matrix-style pager.  Does it work on DragonFly?  Haven’t had a chance to find out.  It needs a video demo.  (via)
  • More UNIX script debugging.  Still Bash-specific, but still useful.
  • Puppet vs. Chef  vs. Ansible vs. Salt.  A useful comparison for those not familiar with these types of tool.  (via)
  • UNIX Proves Staying Power as Enterprise Computing Platform.  Gives a short history of commercial UNIX platforms.
  • I find stories about closing cloud companies compelling.  I’d probably feel different if it was my problems to sort out.

 

Your unrelated link of the week: Mr. T PSA.  It’s a parody of the real thing.  I explicitly mention it because you, the reader, might not be just the right age to remember this.

If that’s not confusing enough, watch this.

Posted by     Categories: I like alliteration, Lazy Reading, UNIXish     8 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/11/10


I spent this entire week saying things like “Wait, today’s Tuesday?” and “I thought this was Wednesday, not Thursday.”

  • Welcome to my GUI Gallery, a whole lot of different GUI screenshots.  This mention of the “Salto” Alto emulator brought me there, and there’s some material I’ve never seen before.  Also, there’s Bob.  Not “Bob” the prophet, but Bob, the computer mistake.  Speaking of problematic designs, see the Windows 8 page.
  • 5 Cool UNIX Hacks.  Sounds linkbaity, but it’s useful.  I didn’t realize that CTRL-a is the non-destructive version of CTRL-u.  (via)
  • This seems strange, but I never heard of PLATO, even though it seems to be the precursor to so much.  (via)
  • Goodbye Google“, in terms of switching to your own platform, seems to be a new trend.
  • arkOS, a similar idea.
  • Finding Files Your Way.  I can never remember all the arguments to ‘find’.
  • Google has a Shell Style Guide.  Which equates to a Bash Style Guide, but that’s OK.  Shell scripts are sometimes considered the most disposable form of programming, so it’s good to see a full guide.  (via)

Your unrelated animation of the week: late for meeting.  A followup to going to the store, which I think I posted here years ago.

Lazy Reading for 2013/11/03


This was a loooooong week, with me working 24 of the last 48 hours.  It didn’t get in the way of the link-gathering, though!

Your unrelated animated image of the day: (via via)

tumblr_muu6bsK7rS1qedb29o1_500

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/10/27


Whee!

Your unrelated link of the week: Deep into Youtube, the top-rated films.  You may want to turn your volume down, and make sure nobody is around.  Not for NSFW content, but because some of those films are so confusing that it’s impossible to explain to someone else why you are watching them.  (via)  There’s some Nico Nico Douga-sourced stuff in there, which I thought I’ve mentioned before, but I can’t find it now.  Why do I even know these things?

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2013/10/20


Whee!

  • The Shady Characters blog talks about alternate phone dial layouts.  I’ve mentioned those here before, but Shady Characters links to this video describing the testing that went on for the keypads.  Check at about 2:40 for the story on how AT&T figured out the ‘correct’ length for the phone handset cable.
  • The Youtube channel for Numberphile, the source of that previous video link, has some pretty entertaining math videos…
  • The UNIX as a Second Language blog has an article up about using strace.
  • The Roland SP-808.  I didn’t know these had a built-in Zip drive.  (via)
  • The ICT 1301 runs again.  This is what big computers are supposed to look like, with large cabinets, and spinning tapes, and oversized operator consoles.  (via)
  • Cryptogeddon, a sort of augmented reality game where I think you sneak your way across real systems.  ‘Real’ as in not someone else’s computers, but real systems set up for this game.  (via)

Your unrelated link of the week: Here’s a weird coincidence.  I was looking at this list of pixelated iconic album covers.  The #3 item is “Trout Mask Replica”, from Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band.  I scanned that specific image back in 1994, on a Mac IIsi in my college lab.  For whatever reason, I’ve seen copies of my scan (color corrected much better than I did) many times since.  I know I’m not hallucinating because I still have the record, with the same wear pattern on the album cover.  It’s odd to see a 20-year-old copy of a 40-year-old album scan you did just pop up out of nowhere.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/10/13


This week just built up and built up.

Your unrelated comic link of the week: Nimona.

Posted by     Categories: Books, Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/10/06


I’m going for pull quotes and dedicated paragraphs this week, just to mix it up.

The Slow Winter.  It’s about the history and trends of chip design, if you can believe it.  “Modern software barely works when the hardware is correct, so relying on software to correct hardware errors is like asking Godzilla to prevent Mega-Godzilla from terrorizing Japan. THIS DOES NOT LEAD TO RISING PROPERTY VALUES IN TOKYO.” I love it so much.   (via)

Richard Stallman on 30 years of GNU.  I don’t agree with everything he says, but the basic point is correct.  “If you use a program to carry out activities in your life, your freedom depends on your having control over the program. ”  (via multiple places)

When Pipes Get Names.  For some reason, I’ve never had to deal with named pipes – directly.  I’ve used them via other programs, of course.

The person who invented Whack-A-Mole also created dedicated email terminals in the 80s/90s called Anti Gravity Freedom Machines.  All those smaller ‘Maker‘ projects seem unenthusiastic compared to this guy.  Anyway, his warehouse full of robots blew up.  I haven’t found pictures yet.

Joblint, a job description checker.  This has more value than I thought.  I’m curious about statistical results over a large number of jobs.  Take a look at those warnings, too – they’re mentioning the possible dark side of a lot of job ‘benefits’.  (via)

This XOXO presentation by Maciej Ceglowski, creator of Pinboard, makes some good points about work, going against countervailing wisdom to some extent.  “You can work on a lot of projects, but you will only get a couple of opportunities to work on something long-term.”  Pinboard is one of those businesses that remains relatively successful without having to get bought by Google to return any profit.  That’s a sort of success I find fascinating.  (via)

CERN has created an in-browser version of… the first web browser.  It accurately displays like a green-screen terminal, including key clicks.  Watching the screen draw gives me flashbacks to playing MUDs.

Adding Vi To Your Zsh.  Can you add vi-like keybindings to tcsh?  (via)

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Art comics links.  It’s a link to more links, but it’s all worthwhile stuff.  Be prepared for difficult but rewarding reading.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     4 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/09/29


Moved 20 servers to new hardware this week.  Normally my workplace doesn’t get very active until snow hits.  Normally.  Anyway, going for the long sentences this week.

Your unrelated link of the week: Proper Opossum Massage.  Yes, it’s a serious video, but it shouldn’t be taken seriously.

Posted by     Categories: Books, Lazy Reading     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/09/22


This week, the sewer drain for my house clogged.  Fixing that is not fun.  What is fun is reading random semi-technical articles around the Internet.  So get clicking!

Posted by     Categories: BSD, Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/09/15


I think I’m finally catching up on the backlog.

Your unrelated link of the week: The Alan Lomax recordings.

Lazy Reading for 2013/09/08


By the time you read this, I’ll have already been sitting on an island for a few days.  There’s so much stuff to post lately I’m scheduling material a week out.

Your unrelated comic link of the week: The Scout, by Malachi Ward.  A self-contained sci-fi story.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/09/01


Another week of links completed early.  And there’s a lot, so get clicking!

Your unrelated link of the week: The remix of this 1997 Kid’s Guide to the Internet - somewhat NSFW, and has all the best moments.  More from EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE.

Lazy Reading for 2013/08/25


This week, I’m opinionated on every link.

  • An 80s computer ad that got almost everything correct.  It used to be sci-fi environments were super-clean – now they’re dirty, with ubiquitous electronics.  That’s something that could be picture-blogged to prove, but I ain’t doing it.
  • Bunnie Huang does “exit interviews” when he stops using equipment.  Given his electronics knowledge, he goes into a lot of detail, including pictures through a microscope.  Speaking of this, how has my ancient HTC Incredible survived 3 years of trips into a salt mine?  I don’t know.
  • InterTwinkles, open source group decision making software.  Don’t know how well it works, but it certainly seems like the right idea.  (via)
  • Turning the Apple //e into a Lisp machine, part 1.  They don’t actually get to the Lisp machine part, but it talks about how Apple computers could load data through the audio jack.  I remember doing that with a tape player, too.  It sucked.  (via)
  • kOS.  It’s so minimal that I am not sure what it can do or how to use it, but it’s also so minimal that I’m sure there must be something to it.  (via)
  • Building a Chording Keyboard.  I’ve mentioned the Microwriter and Twiddler before, but this article goes into a lot of detail about the actual construction of a home-made unit.  (also via)
  • Book review: The Healthy Programmer.  It may or may not make you exercise, but it will make you feel a little guilty about sitting and reading the web like you are doing right now.
  • Hyphen, en dash, em dash, minus.  So few people know there’s a difference.  (via)
  • ASCII Art.  History of, examples, and so on.  (via, with video)
  • Five Useful Git Tips.  Git tips come up all the time, but this one is interesting because it’s using “showterm“, which lets you make text-based animations?  movies? to show a work process in a terminal.  I think I may have linked to something similar before, but this is good.
  • How to Avoid the Emacs Pinky Problem.  A neat idea, but some of the suggestions are actually going to make it worse.  (via)
  • Vim: revisited.  Decent ideas, and the links at the end are good further reading.  There, I’ve posted on both sides of the editor issue.  (via)
  • The problem with Vim.  (via)

Your unrelated link of the week: the Scary Godmother Doll.  One of my favorite illustrators, building a doll.  I met the creator years ago in Pittsburgh; she is an astonishingly energetic person.

 

Posted by     Categories: Books, Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/08/18


Had this one done before the last Lazy Reading.  There are so many things to see and think and do in a day, and they’re not even all on the Internet.  You get only the Internet ones here, though.

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Boulet’s Long Journey.  Get ready for a lot of scrolling.  I know there’s a lot of really good French comics that I don’t see just because I don’t speak the language.  (This one’s in English, but the cartoonist is French.)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/08/11


Again, lots of links.  Some of these are overflow from previous weeks where I just said “That’s enough; let’s work on the next Lazy Reading.”

Your unrelated link of the week: Mighty Taco radio ads.  Mighty Taco is a Mexican fast food place from Buffalo, New York, USA.  It’s about as authentically Mexican as fast food from a city on the edge of Canada can be, which is ‘not much’.  I’ve always loved the food, though, and the commercials are just the right mix of amateur joke and commercial advertising.

Bonus unrelated: If you enjoy imgur/fukung but it’s not youtubey enough, hit ‘Random’ on IWantMoar.com a few times.  You may want to turn down your volume.

Lazy Reading for 2013/08/04


These have been very easy to create over the last few weeks; there’s been a torrent of reading.  Can I say torrent without making it sound like this is all downloaded large files?  The word is overloaded.  Anyway:

Your unrelated link of the week: What goes on when you are not there!

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/07/28


So many links came up recently that I had already finished this week’s entry when last week’s Lazy Reading was posted.

Your unrelated link of the week: Release the Kraken!

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/07/21


Last week was relatively light, but somehow this week I read a zillion interesting things.  It’s been too dang hot to do much else, other than flop in a chair and point a fan at my head.

Your unrelated link of the week: Bones Don’t Lie.  An anthropologist who blogs about various discoveries of human remains.  I really enjoy blogs where someone is talking about a subject they care about – not to sell a product, not to be paid (directly), but just because they like the topic and they want to share it with others.  Of course I would think that, wouldn’t I?

Lazy Reading for 2013/07/14


Busy, busy week.

Your unrelated link(s) of the week: Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan fight scenes.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2013/07/07


A U.S. holiday and very warm weather has made this a less intense week.  At least for links.

Your unrelated link of the week: A new Cyriak-animated video, this time for the band Bloc Party.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     1 Comment

Lazy reading for 2013/06/30


Some of the links this week go pretty in-depth.  Enjoy!

Your unrelated link(s) of the week: Candy Box and A Dark Room.  Both are text-only games, but they use HTML5 for animation.  They start minimal, and build up – be patient; there’s a lot of gameplay in there.  These minimal  games fascinate me.  It’s like reading a book, where it goes from just static text to an entire world being built.  (somewhat via)

Your bonus unrelated comics link of the week: Jack Kirby double-page spreads.  It’s not an exaggeration to say this artwork crackles.  (via I forget)

 

Posted by     Categories: Books, Goings-on, Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/06/23


I was going to make excuses for a low link count because of being on the road this week – but somehow I managed to find a lot to read anyway.  We all win!

Your unrelated link of the week: Who you gonna call?  This kills me because there was some obvious prop work and setup just to create this 7 second joke.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/06/16


This is a text-heavy weekend, given yesterday’s post.  Enjoy!

Your unrelated link of the week: ScummVM in a browser.  Comes with some LucasArts game demos, too. (via many places)

Posted by     Categories: BSD, Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

PRISM, privacy, and what you make yourself


If you’ve been reading the Digest for a while, you’ve seen me talk about the value of hosting or running your own services.  It’s not too much of a surprise in my case; if you are working on an open-source operating system, you want to run it.  It’s good to get the experience, and you can run programs the way you want, instead of picking from whatever vendors happen to sell you.

The PRISM disclosure, which I am going to assume everyone is familiar with at this point, is another facet.  Every time you use another company for your email, your entertainment, your software, and so on, their information on you can be accessed.    This isn’t a problem that can be fixed by going from one webmail provider to another.  You can shop around, but notice that the author in that link effectively throws his or her hands in the air and says, “there’s no way out” by the end of the article.  This is because corporations work as collecting agents for the government, even if they don’t plan to do so.

That sounds drastic, but there’s legal frameworks in every country for governments to require companies to give up data on any person, on request.  It happens.  I’ve seen it myself; I worked for Time Warner for several years, tracking down cable modem user information and handing it over as compelled by law.  I know the lawyers at TW Corporate didn’t like doing it, but they didn’t have a choice.  (I have some horrifying stories about what people would do to themselves and each other.)

Companies are increasingly working to create services to sell, not products to buy.  A service never stops being consumed, so it forms an ongoing revenue stream.  I’m not saying this is bad; I firmly believe that a financial incentive to be paid improves services.  However, as only a consumer, you can end up not owning what you use.  Other people have pointed this out, and I don’t want to sound like a frothing crazy person… but it is relevant, though not necessarily as catastrophic as some people pronounce.

What I’m working towards here is a reminder that you should run your own software, and running it on DragonFly is the best way.  (Or some other operating system, I guess.  If you have to.)  Instead of trying to figure out what the least-bad commercial option can be, run it yourself.  Good for privacy, good for learning.  I know that’s not an option for everyone; fighting with Sendmail (for instance) is not an activity that many people pick voluntarily.  But, if you’ve been thinking of setting up a replacement for Google Reader, or hosting your own mail, or own blog, etc… there’s never a better time than now.

(Follow all those links for some good information; consider it an early Lazy Reading post)

 

Lazy Reading for 2013/06/09


Not as wordy this week, but still wordy.  And linky!

  • Max Headroom and the Strange World of Pseudo-CGI. A discussion of how old fake CGI can look better than modern, real CGI. This is an opinion I’ve had for quite a while, and my children pretty much ignore it every time I bring it up.  (via)
  • The Colby Walkmac, which predates the Mac Luggable.  Linked to because it includes good pictures of what the (external) hardware was like.  I find all the old ports interesting, since it’s all USB and the occasional eSATA these days… not that I’m complaining!  I’ve never had a good experience with a 9-pin serial port.  (via)
  • A brief education on escaping characters.
  • I get worried when remotely rebooting a server in a different town or even state.  In Praise of Celestial Mechanics covers much more stressful circumstances: interplanetary reboots.  Does Voyager 1 or 2 have an ‘uptime’ function?
  • The equivalent of what you are doing right now, 20 years ago.  I personally never got to see this; my experience was MUDs.  Speaking of which…
  • The Birth of MMOs: World of Warcraft’s debt to MUD.  MUD == MMO, Roguelike == Diablo/Torchlight, Doom == almost everything else.  There’s a number of game archetypes that haven’t changed in some time.  (via)
  • Playing with powerlines.  I used to work at a company that used these lines for data transfer.  It was neat technology, but it sure wasn’t easy to set up.  Imagine wiring a city but only being able to use Ethernet hubs.  Not switches, hubs.  That, combined with undersized ARP caches/MAC tables, made it really difficult.
  • OpenVPN on FreeBSD, which will come in handy for at least several readers, I’m sure, as the directions should apply to any BSD.
  • Is there anything DNS can’t be used for?  Cause now it’s domain-based mail policy publishing.  (via ferz on EFNet #dragonflybsd)
  • Have you tried DragonFly?” posts on various forums seem to pop up with some regularity.
  • Uses of tmux, explained.  A slide show talking about how tmux works.  (via)

Unrelated link of the week: I’ve had several deadlines and a mail server with issues this week at work, so this is all I got.

Lazy Reading for 2013/06/02


Last week was a lot of very brief links.  I’ll go for verbosity this week…

  • Regular expressions and regular grammar.  I hope you like detailed explanations.  I’ve said it before: you should understand regular expressions.  The difference between knowing and not knowing is sometimes the difference between knowing how to finish a project, and being hopelessly swamped.  (via)
  • A plea for less (XML) configuration files.  From the same place.  I don’t advocate rejecting XML files out of hand like some people, but I think you need to have a certain existing level of complexity already in your program before you use XML.  For example, so complex that nobody will notice some XML sprinkled in there too.
  • Where Looks Don’t Matter and Only the Best Writers Get Laid, a talk about the Internet from roughly the late 90s to the 2000s.  Some parts of this get farther into political notes than I usually care to read, but I like the point made with “Many women and men alike are using, not building, the web.”  I am frustrated by how the Internet is effectively one-way transmission for so many, like TV.  (via I forget, sorry)
  • Bringing Unix commands to a Windows world.  It’s about Cygwin.  I’ve installed Cygwin a number of times, but it’s such a strange hybrid I eventually stop after using it for whatever specific reason caused the first install.  These days, it’s almost easier to set up a virtual machine on a Windows system and just switch over as needed.
  • The Weird Stuff Warehouse.  How much does this look like your basement?  I like looking in stores like there cause there’s always some hardware item that seems to be worth resurrecting.  (via)
  • Open Source Game Clones.  I feel iffy about these things.  This tends to be viewed as “I want a free game”, not “I want the right to modify a game”.  Also, you could argue it takes revenue away from the original artists who work on a product when it copies the original game methodology, reducing the incentive to produce.  That could be debated, but I am certain of this: I wish people tried original rather than rehashed ideas in open source, because it has a much lower threshold for success.   You don’t need a studio to tell you when you can be published…  which is sort of the idea behind “indie gaming“, I suppose.  (first link via)
  • Remember those old not-a-desktop-not-a-laptop computers?  They looked like this image I saw recently.  I actually learned to use vi in a mild panic on a Sparcstation Voyager, which would be another device in that land between categories.
  • SSH Tricks, found by accident while I was searching for how to do per-host configs in ssh, so that I only had to type a short name and leave off the long suffix (like dragonflybsd.org) when connecting to a server.  Someday I might even get remote port forwarding over ssh correct.
  • USSR’s old domain name attracts criminals.  Somehow I doubt you can identify a criminal site by domain suffix that easily.  (via)

Your unrelated link of the week: Massive Chalice, a Kickstarter for a new strategy and tactics game.  It’s by Double Fine, who has made some fantastic stuff, and it has permadeath, turn-based combat, randomly generated maps… it’s a roguelike!  It’s cross-platform, apparently, though I don’t know if it will work on any BSDs.

 

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike, UNIXish     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2013/05/26


A really packed week, this week.

Your unrelated link of the week: Superman’s Ultimate Crotch Kick.

Posted by     Categories: Books, Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/05/19


Super-compact links week!

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Tom Gauld, a U.K. artist who makes some very entertaining minimal cartoons (recently published), has the best inspirational poster.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

No Lazy Reading


I’m inexplicably short on links this week; I blame my schedule/the nice weather for much for much of the U.S./the class I’m teaching ending/my trip to TCAF for this.  More Lazy Reading next week!  Meanwhile, I have a book review coming up as an alternative.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2013/05/05


Lots of links, not a lot of commentary, this week.  Enjoy!

Your unrelated link of the week: Baman Piderman.  It’s a series of Youtube videos.  Just… roll with it.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/04/28


These are getting denser and denser with links, in part because I’m looking harder and in part because Hacker News is becoming a better and better source of links; there seems to be a new go-to site for tech links every 8-12 months.  Slashdot, then Digg, then Reddit, then Hacker News…

  •  Intel has published a HTML5 development environment.  I don’t even know if it would work on DragonFly or even any BSD, but I feel efforts to make tools that are actually, genuinely, crossplatform should be looked at.  Defensive platform-specific content seems to still be a thing.
  • Slightly related: Building a Roguelike in Javascript.  There’s several parts to this.  (via)
  • The Eternal Mainframe.  The argument is a little wild-eyed, but the underlying thesis: “Cloud == Mainframe” is valid.  (via)
  • A Primer on IPv4, IPv6, and Transition.  I signed up for an IPv6 tunnel recently, but I’m not directing traffic over it.  I should be.  (via)
  • How to make Your Open Source Project Really Awesome.  The title is linkbaity, but the steps listed are correct.  You will look at the “If you want to completely screw your users…” notes and nod to yourself, recognizing something that bit you.  (via)
  • There’s still Apple ][ software being sold.  I vaguely feel like I bought from there before…  (via)
  • Everything’s being put into a git repo these days.  (via)  Wait, spoke too soon.  (thanks, ‘bla’ in comments)
  • Scaling Pinterest.  I like seeing what technology is used as a site transitions from “oh yeah, running on leftover hardware in my basement” to “we need to hire yet another person to keep this all running”.  (via)

Your unrelated link of the week: Sometimes, repeated variations on a single theme can lead to some entertaining humor.  Therefore, Dog Snack.

(Did I just sneak in two unrelated links?  Yes I did.)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike     3 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/04/21


I think spring has arrived; everything’s turning green, and a young man’s thoughts turn to computer hardware upgrades.  Time to move to 64-bit!  Anyway, lots of links this week.  These are getting more and more content-filled over time, but I don’t think anyone minds…

  • For the Bitcoin enthusasts: ‘…when my wife refuses to bring him cake on our sofa, he calls it a “denial-of-service attack”’ (via)
  • Make It So, coverage of computer interfaces from movies.  I always thought that was what Enlightenment was trying to achieve: the Interface From The Future.  (via several places)
  • Same computer interface topic, but from anime movies.  It would be nice if this became something people actively worked on, instead of Bitcoin selling and Facebook monetizing.  (via)
  • Flat icons/monochromatic icons seem to be another microtrend.  This is probably because few people do small dimensional icons well.  My favorite was always the BeOS set.
  • On benchmarks.  It says what you should already know, but I like the Phoronix/MD5 benchmarking joke.  (via EFNet #dragonflybsd)
  • This article titled “The Meme Hustler” draws a finer line than I’ve seen before between “open source” and “free software”.    The author, Evgeny Morozov, seems to also have a hate-on for Tim O’Reilly.  See some reviews of a recent Morozov book for a counterpoint, of sorts.
  • Spacewar championship, 1972, in Rolling Stone.  Exactly two years before I was born!   At this point, finding things older than me makes me a bit happy.  There’s a picture of a Dynabook in there, photographed by Annie Liebowitz.  It’s entertaining to read this 40-year-old story and see how well it predicts the future.  I’m also sort of amazed it exists, in Rolling Stone.  More Spacewar links here.
  • Meet the Web’s Operating System: HTTP.  “Because HTTP is ultimately the one social contract on the web that, amidst a million other debates over standards, rules, policies, and behavior, we have collectively agreed to trust.”  (via)
  • Ancient computers in use today.  I’ve linked to a story about that IBM 402 before,  but the following pages about VAX and Apple ][e systems are new.  Well, new to read, certainly not new hardware.  (via)
  • Yahoo Chat!  A Eulogy.  The spray of forbidden words is an entertaining acknowledgement message.  (via)
  • The $12 Gongkai Phone.  Bunnie Huang breakdowns are always fun, and he’s describing a strange sort of open source that isn’t through license.  (via)
  • The FreeBSD Foundation is looking to hit a million dollars donated this year, which seems quite possible given last year’s performance.  Donate if you can; their activities help the whole BSD community.
  • A Complete History of Breakout.  It’s not actually complete, but that’s OK.  It includes Steve Jobs being a jerk and Steve Wozniak being very clever, which is their traditional roles.  (via)
  • Ack 2.0 is out.  It’s a very useful utility; I’d like to see more standalone utilities created this way.
  • Space Claw, Flickr via BBS.  You’ll need telnet.   (via)

Your unrelated link of the week: Shady Characters, a typography/history blog I’ve linked to before, has a book out.  If you liked those links, you know what to do next.

Posted by     Categories: BSD, FreeBSD, Lazy Reading, UNIXish     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/04/14


We are very close to the next release.  As always, it comes down to building third-party software.  Lots of material here to read, until then.

Your unrelated link of the week: A bunch of monster models, all taken at a convention called Monsterpalooza.  A bit grody, but still some very good construction work.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: BSD, Lazy Reading, roguelike, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/04/07


It’s a week past Easter and I’m actually tired of eating chocolate.  I never thought I’d say that.

Your unrelated link of the week: nothing.  I didn’t find anything off-the-wall enough to use here.  Geez.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, OpenBSD     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/03/31


I hope you like reading; there’s some very meaty links this week.  Go get a cup of tea and settle in.  You drink tea, don’t you?  You ought to.

  • Reading about KDE’s repository near-meltdown makes me think we need more checks for DragonFly.  We have the advantage of Hammer, of course, which would help in the same way that the linked article names ZFS as a ‘fix’.  (via multiple places)
  • We know that Apple will reject apps it disagrees with.  Google also will do so.  Has there ever been a program rejected from pkgsrc or (FreeBSD/OpenBSD) ports on content grounds?  Not that I know of – anyone remember differently?  I’d argue that’s a favorable point for the BSD packaging systems, though it may just be that no application has tested those boundaries yet.
  • Portscanning all IPv4 addresses on the planet.  Possibly the largest distributed effort ever?  The detail in the maps and returned services is especially interesting.  (via)
  • Scale Fail, a Youtube video of a 2011 talk about screwing up your services.  Mostly about the humor, but the underlying points are valid.   (via #dragonflybsd IRC)
  • There’s still improvement possible to fsck, apparently based on this.  That’s UFS2 fsck.
  • What is your most productive shortcut with Vim?  A very thorough explanation of verbs, marks, and registers.  Holy cow, I wish I had known about ‘: … v’ before.  It’s long, but worth it.  (via)
  • Matthew Garret’s description of Secure Boot vs. Restricted Boot with UEFI, (via a coworker who went to Libreplanet 2013).  I’m still not sure what DragonFly will need to do about this.
  • I missed mentioning this earlier: 20 years of NetBSD.  We’re coming up on 10 soon.
  • Dragonfly drones.  Unrelated except for name.
  • That guy who starts to froth madly every time BSD is mentioned on Phoronix is still there (see comments).
  • Mainframe computer supercut.  (via)

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Tom Spurgeon of the Comics Reporter asked people for their lists of webcomics that could go in a ‘Hall of Fame’.  The resulting list is a lot of really, really good material.  Go use up a few hours reading.

Lazy Reading for 2013/03/24


It’s still snowing in my area, which is unusual.  And great!

Your unrelated comics link of the week: French cartoonist Boulet knocks it out of the park again.

Lazy Reading for 2013/03/17


You know what stinks?  I find a really cool thing online somewhere, early in the week, or even in a previous week, like today’s unrelated link.  Between me finding it and this always-on-Sunday post, other people encounter it, the link gets reposted everywhere, and it’s old hat by the time you see it here.  Yeah, I’m complaining like it’s hipster linking!

Your unrelated link of the week: I almost can’t tell this is a parody.  Actually, it’s more like a double level of parody.  Seen on this inexplicable, wonderful Tumblog; found via arts inscrutable.

Bonus link: Dog Snack Episode 3.

 

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike, UNIXish     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2013/03/10


I managed to come up with a lot of links this week, somehow, despite the start of the class I’m teaching in addition to normal work.  And Summer of Code’s coming up!  And we’re due for a release relatively soon!  I may appear somewhat… stretched over the next few weeks.

Your unrelated link of the week: I’m the Computer Man.  I always thought the mid-1990s were sort of a Internet/computer teenager phase.  Everything had potential but everything was also awkward.  (via I forget, sorry!)

Lazy Reading for 2013/03/03


I am all over the place with links this week – some of them pretty far off the path.  There’s a lot, too, so enjoy!

Your unrelated link of the week: I’ve already been offbeat enough in this Lazy Reading; I don’t have anything else.

Lazy Reading for 2013/02/24


A calm week, for once.

  • Via Michael W. Lucas: Absolut OpenBSD.
  •  Another ‘How I customize Vim’ style post.  These things always sound great, but I worry that it’s not something that can be duplicated.  If you had to rebuild or duplicate your Vim environment elsewhere, you’d have to write out your own instructions.  Not impossible, but I don’t have to do that for anything else.  (via)
  • Twine, a game creation tool that really requires only writing.  (via)
  • The Oxford Comma, or how it doesn’t matter.  (via)
  • The Story of the PING Program.  I could have sworn I linked to this before.  I remember having someone explain ping to me when I was young and had little experience of IP networking; it seemed like magic where the computers would actually talk.  (via vsrinivas on EFNet #dragonflybsd)
  • ARPANet, 1971, as a tattoo.  (via)

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Reid Fleming, World’s Toughest Milkman.  All the early issues, available in electronic form, for pay-what-you-want.  (And I advise paying; it’s a fun comic)  Look at a sample page if you are curious.

Posted by     Categories: BSD, Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/02/17


This week I will both post this on the correct day AND get the date in the title correct.

Your unrelated tea link of the week: Epic Tea House Server.  Interesting just because of what he does and because I’ve never encountered tea from a samovar, though I’ve read of it.  (via)

Wait, this is better!  That previous link led to this film from an English chemistry professor about tea chemistry.  At first I was just entertained by his hair and his accent, but when he put tea in a NMR spectrometer, I decided this was the best tea thing ever.  Even better than Elemental!

Lazy Reading for 2013/02/10


For once, I didn’t accidentally post this too early.  I hope you have some spare time; there’s a lot of meaty links this week.

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Anthony Clark of Nedroid.com is selling his sketchbook; 101 pages as a digital download, for $1.  Look at his strip or his Tumblr doodles if you want to know more before, but that’s quite a deal.  Nedroid is the source of one of my favorite character names: Beartato.  Also makes a good shirt.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike, UNIXish     4 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/02/03


No theme evolved this week, but that’s OK.

Your unrelated link of the week: MeTube: August sings Carmen ‘Habanera’.  Might be NSFW, probably will make you mildly confused or uncomfortable.  Here’s the ‘making of’ video which is all in German, I think.  If that’s too much, try a recent Cyriak-animated video.  I never thought I’d recommend a Cyriak video as the less disturbing thing to watch.

Posted by     Categories: Books, BSD, Lazy Reading     4 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/01/27


Whee!

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Kyle Baker comics, available as PDFs for free.  Go, read.

Posted by     Categories: Books, Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/01/20


Ok, now posting this on the correct day…

Your unrelated comic link of the week: The Game, by Boulet.  Goes with some of the links.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/01/06


I’m going for the terse list of links.  It’s sort of Neukirchen-ish.

Your unrelated link(s) of the week: Some very good tutorial videos.  Don’t worry, it’s just electrostatic dischargewire safetyfun with capacitors, and how to make a Windows shortcut (via/via)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     2 Comments

Lazy reading for 2012/12/30


The last of the year.

Your unrelated comics link of the week: Marlo Meekins’ Tumblr.   Her lettering is refreshingly expressive.  That may sounds strange to single out, but so many people place words as an set block of text rather than as part of a graphic layout.

Posted by     Categories: FreeBSD, Lazy Reading, roguelike, UNIXish     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2012/12/23


I started this Lazy Reading early, since I had so many links it overflowed into the next week.  Merry almost Christmas!

Your unrelated link of the week: I work at a salt mine.  One of the highlights of my job is when I’m in the mine and need to get somewhere quickly; I use a 4-wheeler to drive.  (I’m licensed to operate it.)  There’s no stop signs, no stoplights, and generally a whole lot of straight roads with no obstacles or traffic.    It can be a fun drive.  However, it’s not as cool as driving on the moon.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     4 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/12/16


I hope you like links, and lots of history.  It’s been a bumper crop this week.

Your unrelated link(s) of the week: Said the Gramophone and The New Shelton Wet/Dry.  The first one’s a music blog, and the second’s more general.  Both have a somewhat random feel with the images used – completely random in the New Shelton’s case.  It’s interesting that there’s such a flood of text and images on the Internet that you can reassemble content out of all of it.  You can’t push over a bookshelf and call it a library, but you can build a whole new narrative from random assembly of Internet data.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/12/09


This is a mini-theme Lazy Reading, where I find small groups of related things.

Your unrelated link of the week: The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things.  Also known as ‘old weird crap’, but that’s OK – still interesting.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/12/02


It’s been a quiet week, but that’s OK.  I have sick kids, sick coworkers, and a certification test this Monday…

Your unrelated link of the week: GET LAMP.  I thought I had linked to it before, but I’m probably thinking of It Is Pitch Dark.  It’s a documentary by Jason Scott of textfiles fame about text adventures.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, roguelike, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/11/25


It’s ‘old week’!

Your unrelated link of the week: Disused Rochester Subway.  I used to work about half a mile from one end of this structure, and have been in several of the locations pictured.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/11/18


Apparently this is history week for Lazy Reading.

  •  You know what I like about older retail games?  Not the playing, but the paraphernalia that came with it – maps, histories, stories on printed paper.  This Empire for Apple ][ description even has pictures of a hand-drawn timeline.
  • Remember when Enlightenment was considered too graphically intensive to run easily?  Now E17 is in alpha!  (via multiple places including here.)
  • The regular expression that’s the equivalent of a shrug and a handwave.
  • Why BSD is better than Linux” (2002).  It’s an old PDF presentation, but a good history overview.  I got a kick out of slide 40.
  • Rob Pike on why object-oriented programming isn’t always awesome.  Slightly related: I wish Google+ pages had RSS feeds.  (via)
  • The GPL is usually described as a defense for users against companies.  What if it’s being used as a bludgeon by one company against another?
  • Remember in last week’s Lazy Reading, I pointed at complaints about Linuxisms; changes that assumed Linux was the only Unixlike system.  The problem continues even within distributions.  There’s a common thread of the people involved.
  • When In Git, different animated gifs set to different git habits and events.  This is the next stage after rage comics.

Your unrelated link of the week: The Useless Web.  Random single-purpose sites, and oddly compelling.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2012/11/11


The 3.2 release seems to have gone well.  Who has tried the new USB support?  I’m curious to see how it’s going.

Your unrelated link of the week: This roundup of ultrarealist human sculpture.  You’ve probably seen Ron Mueck‘s art before, at least.

Lazy Reading for 2012/11/04


I’m glad 3.2 is out the door.  I think I spent more time on release notes and watching package builds than any other release.

Your unrelated link of the day: Sir, You Are Being Hunted.  I link to the Kickstarter for this game for no other reason than I think it would be fun to play.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, NetBSD, Periodicals     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/10/28


Life is busy, busy, busy.  But there’s always time for Lazy Reading!

  • Sometimes Google searches turn up DragonFly BSD in odd places.
  • Wayland reached 1.0.   That’s great, except it isn’t ready for use yet, it’s just feature-stable.  I’d argue that means it’s ‘beta’, not 1.0, but there’s no hard and fast rules about that.  In any case, does it run on any BSD?  I don’t think so.
  • OpenSSH server best practices.  Nothing too groundbreaking, but they include “BSD” (i.e. pf) examples.  I always like articles that don’t assume Linux is the only platform.  (via)
  • The little SSH that (sometimes) couldn’t.  A heck of a network debugging exercise.  (via mat in #dragonflybsd)
  • The AN/FSQ7, a computer I’m sure I’ve seen in movies a number of times.  (via)
  • Here’s the OpenBSD slides from EuroBSDCon 2012.
  • Oh look, Apple’s got “Fusion Drive“.  The cool people call it swapcache and have been using it for years, so there.
  • Here’s an essay that starts out talking about Quantum Computing and moves into the ambivalence that quantum computing seems to entail instead of just noting the general scientific description and leaving it there.  It’s really quite enjoyable.
  • Hey, maybe this is why Facebook reported earnings are up: they’re holding your own data hostage.  (via)
  • Rob Pike on The Setup.  He makes a very good point about how we should access computers.  Also, here’s a recent, long slide show he put together about Go.  It describes solving some language problems that have been around a long time.   (via)
  • I was halfway through reading that last slide show link and realized there’s no way I can explain how it was an worthwhile read to someone who hadn’t done some programming.  No link or conclusion, just an observation of how esoteric this is.  I hope you enjoy it.
  • Essential Vim and Vi Skills has hit a 3rd edition.  I have this as a Kindle edition, and I’m not sure how that happened.
  • Zork in Duplicity, or a bizarre finding of old UNIX history in a completely unrelated place.  (via)
  • These OpenBSD thin clients are a neat idea.

Your unrelated link of the week: Delilah Dirk.  It’s a comic, and the story available to read online is about a tea merchant, which makes it exactly right.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, OpenBSD, UNIXish     2 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/10/21


I had some interesting home network troubleshooting over the past week…

Your unrelated link of the week: Terrorism as Art.  An extended profile of Survival Research Laboratories at The Verge.  Even if you don’t like the content, the focus of the artist is remarkable.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, UNIXish     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2012/10/14


I lost 12 18 hours of my life fighting with an Exchange 2010 upgrade this week.  To compensate, I will never complain about Sendmail wonkiness ever.

  • Homebrew Cray-1A.  Duplicating the internals is interesting in a “that’s crazy/difficult” way, but the case is the best part.  (via dfcat on #dragonflybsd)
  • If you understand the structure of haiku, you can contribute to Absolute OpenBSD, 2nd Ed.
  • Here’s a browser-based roguelike called Second Wind, and another called Epilogue.  No particular reason to link to them other than I haven’t had much roguelikes linked recently.
  • The role of the troll in social media is to ruin that product.”  There’s a line that can be drawn to connect the idea of being esoteric enough that social networks (i.e. Facebook) don’t intrude on your interests, and the idea of being interested in BSD operating system creation.  What I’m saying is that BSD is less hyped, and thank goodness.
  • Another social media caution: it’s their space, not yours, and they can boot you at any time. (via)
  • Yeah, I’m getting curmudgeonly.  I’ll stop now.
  • Go By Example.
  • git-ftp, when the files you are working on are in a location only accessible by FTP – no git or ssh access.  This appears to copy them in and out as part of the commit/change process.  I can imagine a very specific workflow where this would be useful.  (via)
  • Bash One-Liners, part 4.
  • OS Upgrades powered by Git.  That’s a neat idea.  I don’t think you actually have to follow the link; that’s the whole concept right there.
  • The Ultimate Vim Distribution.  (via)  I like how slick the single-line install methods are on these things…  but I want the number of packaging/install methods on every computer I administer to equal exactly 1, not (1 x number of installed programs).
  • Why is Linux more popular than BSD?  Some of the answers are just plain wrong, or don’t understand causality… but that’s no surprise.  (via)
  • Oh, hopefully this will solve the UEFI secureboot issue for DragonFly too.  (via)

Your unrelated link of the week:  A CD that comes with its own turntable and record.  Kid Koala scrapes over culture to find mentions of vinyl and DJing the same way I scrounge the Internet for mention of BSD.  His “Nerdball” from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is an astonishing display  of turntable skill.

Posted by     Categories: Lazy Reading, OpenBSD, roguelike, UNIXish     1 Comment

Lazy Reading for 2012/10/07


DragonFly 3.2 branches tomorrow if all goes to plan. Until then, I have a lot of reading here for you.

Your unrelated link of the week: Dog Shaming.  I have a parrot, rabbit, and lizard.  They seem like easy, normal pets compared to some of these stories.

 

Posted by     Categories: BSD, Lazy Reading, pkgsrc, UNIXish     0 Comments