Category: DragonFly

Deduplication benefits, again


Remember my recent disk issues?  As a side effect of protecting myself, I have a good example of deduplication results.

I have a second disk in my server, with slave Hammer PFSs to match what’s on my main disk.  I hadn’t put them in fstab, so they weren’t getting mounted and updated.  I got them re-created, but they were nearly full.  Here’s an abbreviated df, from which you should be able to tell which drives I have :

Size   Used   Avail   Capacity
929G   729G   200G    78%    /slave/slavehome
929G   729G   200G    78%    /slave/slavevar
929G   729G   200G    78%    /slave/slaveusr
929G   729G   200G    78%    /slave/slaveslash

That 78% is how full the Hammer volume was.  I turned on Hammer deduplication, since it’s off by default.  The very next day:

Size   Used   Avail   Capacity
929G   612G   318G    66%    /slave/slavehome 
929G   612G   318G    66%    /slave/slavevar 
929G   612G   318G    66%    /slave/slaveusr 
929G   612G   318G    66%    /slave/slaveslash

It’s a 1 terabyte disk, and I gained more than 10% back – That’s 100g of disk space that I gained overnight.  There might be more tomorrow, given that it was all of 5 minutes of dedup work.

This won’t surprise you if you’ve seen previous deduplication links here, like my previous results or some real-world tests.  It’s still great.  I’d suggest turning it on if you haven’t – hammer viconfig the appropriate PFS and uncomment the dedup line.

 

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Hammer     1 Comment

What’s your XML opinion?


There’s several debates exclusive to the Unix-like world: Vi vs. Emacs, System V vs. BSD, and so on.  A more recent one that people tend to fragment over is XML in config files vs. anything else.  Read through this recent threa, starting here, about SMF (which became about XML) on users@.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Goings-on     4 Comments

DragonFly and Summer of Code, week 10


Only 3 more Mondays left in the student work part of Summer of Code!  Unsurprisingly, it seems the students are mostly in the cleanup phase – as it should be.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

DragonFly 3.4.3 rolled soon


I’ll be working on the 3.4.3 release of DragonFly within the next 24 hours, and it should be available this week.  I’ll have a list of the bugfixes it contains…

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Goings-on     2 Comments

DragonFly and Go


It’s really neat to suddenly encounter something done just for DragonFly that you didn’t know was coming: A port of Go to DragonFly.   I think these changes are going into the next Go release, or at least I hope so.  (More on Go if you haven’t encountered it before.)

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Goings-on     1 Comment

Details on dragonflybsd.org hardware


If you’re curious about the hardware being used for the colocated dragonflybsd.org servers (this includes the website, the repository, the mailing lists, dports build machines, etc.), here’s the ‘MicroCloud’ product page.  DragonFly’s model was purchased from iXsystems.   Apparently those Haswell processors have a fantastic power consumption to performance ratio.  (via)

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

DragonFly and Summer of Code, week 9


I’m running a bit behind because I’ve been on the road, but here they are:

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Wanted: a Mailman patch


One of the most-requested items for the DragonFly mailing list archives is reverse sorting by date.  Mailman, which is what’s being used now for archiving, doesn’t have a ‘native’ way to do that.  Has anyone seen a trick/patch to get that to happen?  I already patch Mailman to get the message date to show in listings.

Posted by     Categories: About This Site, DragonFly, Off-Topic     1 Comment

A vkernel addon task


Sepherosa Ziehau suggests this relatively easy task: adding a TSC cputimer to vkernels.   Apparently most of the framework to do this is already in place.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Please test     0 Comments

USB support improves


I’m a bit slow in posting this, but that’s OK since it’s a work in progress: Markus Pfeiffer has added some more work on USB4BSD porting to DragonFly, including some device-specific changes.

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

Do you have a Cyrix processor?


I’d be really surprised to find this affects anyone, but it’s possible: some kernel options specific to Cyrix processors have been removed, by Sascha Wildner.

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

DragonFly and Summer of Code, week 8


If you look at the reports from students this week, they are mostly “I had bugs and I fixed them and there’s not much to do other than test”, which is the sign of well-planned projects.   Here’s the status reports:

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Mailing list archives update note


The mailing list archives for DragonFly (lists.dragonflybsd.org) have been moved to new hardware.  (Yay!)  The patch that actually shows date in the listings needs to reapplied, cause Mailman is somewhat stale.  (Boo!)  I applied the patch and I’m regenerating all the archives now.  (Yay!)  There’s some garbled messages in the archives that cause a bunch of “no subject” partial messages to be dumped at the end.  (Boo!)  I’ll manually fix them if I can, someday.  (Yay?)

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Goings-on     2 Comments

Slight DragonFlyBSD.org service interruption


Several parts of dragonflybsd.org are moving to a new blade server, so there may be some service interruptions during the transition.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Goings-on     1 Comment

TTM arrives for DragonFly


Francois Tigeot has ported TTM to DragonFly from FreeBSD and I think a bit from OpenBSD.  All this work has led to an update in the driver porting notes.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly, FreeBSD, OpenBSD     0 Comments

DragonFly and Summer of Code, week 7


Everyone passed their Summer of Code midterms!  Not that this was a surprise; all the students have been consistently working and overcoming problems, but a 100% pass rate makes me happy.

Here’s the status reports:

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Credential descriptors


Joris Giovannangeli, one of the Summer of Code students for DragonFly, posted his thoughts on credential descriptors – have a read.  He is working on capsicum and DragonFly, so this is a natural thought process.

Power savings and Haswell chips


If you have a computer with one of the very-very-new Haswell processors from Intel, Matthew Dillon has made some changes that will interest you.  They shave off (in the example given) about 20% of CPU power usage without much effect on performance.

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

Just kill everything


killall -T will now kill all processes associated with the current tty, except parents of the killall process itself.  It’s a shortcut to “kill all these runaway items I started by accident”.

KMS and i915 support in DragonFly


Thanks to the effort of a number of people, DragonFly (-current) now supports KMS and accelerated video on Intel 915 chipsets.  It’s 2D and x86_64 only for now, but it’s much, much better than just using the vesa driver.

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

Newest committer: Johannes Hofmann


Please welcome our newest DragonFly committer: Johannes Hofmann.  He earned this by coming up with a significant chunk of DragonFly’s upcoming KMS/915 support, and it’s now easier to just have him work directly than to be constantly committing for him.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Goings-on     2 Comments

DragonFly and Summer of Code, week 6


It’s week 6, I think, and the midterms are coming up.  Here’s the status reports:

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Ansible and dports


Michael W. Lucas wrote a blog post about pkgng and Ansible on FreeBSD.  Will it work on DragonFly?  We already have pkgng on DragonFly in the form of dports, and Ansible… might work?  Please, someone try.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly, FreeBSD     1 Comment

About dports, packages, and servers


In part of a long thread about dports packages on the users@ list, Matthew Dillon notes that a new set of packages for i386 and x86_64, for 3.4 and for “3.6″ (meaning bleeding-edge DragonFly, even though that’s numbered 3.5) is mostly uploaded.  He also notes that a Haswell-processor-based blade server for DragonFly is in the works, so much of the dragonflybsd.org infrastructure is going to move from his house to a datacenter, with the benefits that provides.  It’ll also help automate binary package building.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly     0 Comments

SO_REUSEPORT speedups


Sepherosa Ziehau added SO_REUSEPORT to DragonFly.  I don’t know how the mechanism works, because he didn’t include a description, but he did include a explanation of just how much it reduces CPU usage during as-high-as-physically-possible network load.  He even wrote tools to test it more heavily.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Goings-on     0 Comments

DragonFly and Summer of Code, week 5


I’m late for this, even though the students weren’t.  Mea culpa!  There’s been a lot of discussion on IRC, in EFNet #dragonflybsd, between the students and various DragonFly developers.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     1 Comment

Intel KMS support coming soon


Thanks to the efforts of a large number of people, KMS support is showing up in DragonFly.  This supports accelerated video on the new Intel graphics chipsets that seem to show up on many recent laptops.

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

Emulex OneConnect support added


Do you have a Emulex OneConnect 10Gb NIC?  Well good news!  Sascha Wildner brought in updated the oce(4) driver from FreeBSD to support Skyhawk models in DragonFly.

(My bad; looked at the wrong oce(4) commit originally and re-reported the import instead of the update.)

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly, FreeBSD     0 Comments

GSoC and DragonFly, week 4


We’ve never had a group of student post progress this regularly.  It’s great!

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Hammer and Go


Something new and odd: A port of the Hammer (1) filesystem into Go, for go-fuse.  As the author has said, it’s more for the practice of learning Go and Hammer than for producing anything useful.  Still, an interesting way to learn.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Hammer     1 Comment

Routing stability changes


Apparently Sepherosa Ziehau has been improving DragonFly’s route table performance under extremely heavy load.  (e.g. run efficiently; don’t die)  I don’t have a definitive commit message to point at, but looking at his recent commits are a good start.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly     0 Comments

Hammer 2 and encryption, briefly


Encryption seems to be the accidental theme tonight.  A question about Hammer 2 and encryption prompted this list of possible solutions from Matthew Dillon.  Hammer 2 is still months out, so these features both require time and someone interesting in doing them – though they sound quite possible.

Still not sure if I should be writing Hammer or HAMMER.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Hammer     0 Comments

Encrypting /home


If you were wanting to encrypt your /home directory, Pierre Abbat has written up the explicit steps he took to do that very thing.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Hammer     0 Comments

GSoC and DragonFly, week 3


Week 3 is underway, and the students are starting to get into the meat of their projects:

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Release announcement for pkgsrc-2013Q2


The pkgsrc-2013Q2 branch has been out for some days, but the official release announcement has now been published, with details on the number of ports.  You should be able to pull it down from dragonflybsd.org via git, by the way.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, pkgsrc     0 Comments

pkgsrc-2013Q2 is out


The official announcement has gone out.  You should be able to pull pkgsrc-2013Q2 via git from dragonflybsd.org within the next 24 hours.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, pkgsrc     1 Comment

GSoC and DragonFly, week 2


All the Summer of Code students for DragonFly have posted their second week reports:

There’s a lot of progress for the second week, which is wonderful!

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Emulex card support


If you have an Emulex BladeEngine 2 or 3, or an Emulex Lancer, it should work in DragonFly, thanks to Sascha Wildner’s recent commit.   Emulex has 10Gb network cards, in case you were like me and not familiar with the name.

(You thought I was going to type “Sepherosa Ziehau”, didn’t you?)  

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

KDE 3.5 going out of dports


FreeBSD ports, and therefore Dragonfly dports, will drop KDE 3.5 items sometime very soon.  It’s possible to continue to build them in dports, but it’s extra work.  If you need them, volunteer, because otherwise they will be dropped.  (An idea I fully support.)

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly     0 Comments

GSoC Hammer and compression performance numbers


Earlier this week, Daniel Flores posted the first-week report on his Google Summer of Code project, file compression in Hammer.  He mentioned that the LZ4 algorithm he is using seems to have the best performance with repeating text data, as in logfiles.  I asked for numbers, and he provided them.  The important data in the results is the total compression column.  It shows how many 64k blocks were able to be compressed, with that type of data.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code, Hammer     0 Comments

mps(4) users, take note


If you have a mps(4) device (LSI Fusion-MPT 2 SAS disk controller), you may be interested in Matthew Dillon’s large commit of bugfixes from FreeBSD.  Specifically, he notes that the drive gets ‘overtagged’, and performance can be greatly improved by reducing the number of tags used.

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

Netperf and Jain’s fairness index


Thanks to Sepherosa Ziehau, Netperf will now calculate Jain’s fairness index.  That is a formula that is both interesting and unfamiliar to me.  Not that I understand it, of course – it’s just because it has a neat name.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly     0 Comments

OpenJDK7, everywhere


It looks like OpenJDK7 works in pkgsrc for DragonFly, thanks to Ryo ONODERA, and I think it’s working in dports too.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly, pkgsrc     0 Comments

Recompile needed for DragonFly 3.5 users


Because Sepherosa Ziehau changed mbstat, anyone on bleeding-edge DragonFly will need to rebuild world, or else netstat will become confused.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly, Heads Up!     1 Comment

Summer of Code, first week reports


All the Summer of Code students for DragonFly have posted their first week reports:

If any of these projects are interesting to you, or if you have any tips for these students on work they are doing, please provide feedback.

 

 

 

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

A BSD without i386


There’s already been some previous conversation about how much longer to support the i386 platform for DragonFly.  It looks like PC-BSD will be the first ‘flavor’ of BSD to make the jump.  Support for PC-BSD on i386 will be dropped after release 9.2.  That includes ‘TrueOS‘, the version of PC-BSD for servers, which I did not know about until just now.

Posted by     Categories: BSD, DragonFly, PC-BSD     12 Comments

New timer available


There’s support for a new timer mechanism in DragonFly 3.5, for x86_64 users: TSC.  Sepherosa Ziehau added support and has described how to disable it - it’s on by default.  It speeds up some very basic (and frequently used) system calls.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly     0 Comments

Avoiding non-routeable IPs


It’s possible your Internet service provider uses a non-routeable IP range (like 10.*) and occasionally your border device picks that up via DHCP by accident instead of an Internet address.  If that happens to you, and you’re using DragonFly as your border gateway, it’s possible to prevent it with PF dhclient.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, pf, Someday you will need this     2 Comments

Another tip: cleaning up a really, really full Hammer drive


If you get your Hammer drive really full, a normal cleanup won’t make enough space.  When that happen, use ‘hammer reblock’ in increasing increments.  That works because it does cleanup in much smaller steps.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Someday you will need this     0 Comments

PRISM, privacy, and what you make yourself


If you’ve been reading the Digest for a while, you’ve seen me talk about the value of hosting or running your own services.  It’s not too much of a surprise in my case; if you are working on an open-source operating system, you want to run it.  It’s good to get the experience, and you can run programs the way you want, instead of picking from whatever vendors happen to sell you.

The PRISM disclosure, which I am going to assume everyone is familiar with at this point, is another facet.  Every time you use another company for your email, your entertainment, your software, and so on, their information on you can be accessed.    This isn’t a problem that can be fixed by going from one webmail provider to another.  You can shop around, but notice that the author in that link effectively throws his or her hands in the air and says, “there’s no way out” by the end of the article.  This is because corporations work as collecting agents for the government, even if they don’t plan to do so.

That sounds drastic, but there’s legal frameworks in every country for governments to require companies to give up data on any person, on request.  It happens.  I’ve seen it myself; I worked for Time Warner for several years, tracking down cable modem user information and handing it over as compelled by law.  I know the lawyers at TW Corporate didn’t like doing it, but they didn’t have a choice.  (I have some horrifying stories about what people would do to themselves and each other.)

Companies are increasingly working to create services to sell, not products to buy.  A service never stops being consumed, so it forms an ongoing revenue stream.  I’m not saying this is bad; I firmly believe that a financial incentive to be paid improves services.  However, as only a consumer, you can end up not owning what you use.  Other people have pointed this out, and I don’t want to sound like a frothing crazy person… but it is relevant, though not necessarily as catastrophic as some people pronounce.

What I’m working towards here is a reminder that you should run your own software, and running it on DragonFly is the best way.  (Or some other operating system, I guess.  If you have to.)  Instead of trying to figure out what the least-bad commercial option can be, run it yourself.  Good for privacy, good for learning.  I know that’s not an option for everyone; fighting with Sendmail (for instance) is not an activity that many people pick voluntarily.  But, if you’ve been thinking of setting up a replacement for Google Reader, or hosting your own mail, or own blog, etc… there’s never a better time than now.

(Follow all those links for some good information; consider it an early Lazy Reading post)

 

Rough network queues added


Sepherosa Ziehau has added a sort of queuing to altq, where TCP ACKs get higher priority.  You may have seen this in any number of pf configurations, where returning data is given its own queue to keep high-volume transfers from slowing themselves down because the acknowledgements can’t get back to the sender.  His commit has statistics on the performance improvement.  He also added a ‘netrate‘ tool for calculating results from using netperf.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly     0 Comments

Symbol versioning coming in, also buildworld


If you’re using DragonFly 3.5, your next update should be a full buildworld.  That’s because John Marino is adding the framework for symbol versioning.  This means that individual library (.so) files will internally keep track of newer and older symbols.  The current behavior is to name the files differently, which can cause problems if an expected, linked file is missing – even if the needed symbols are present.  The basic framework is being added now, and will be turned on all at once, to minimize the number of times that full buildworld is needed.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly     0 Comments

Old amd64 removed and extra upgrade step added


The ‘amd64′ specific parts of kernel architecture have been removed, since x86_64 covers all that.  As a side effect of other changes, John Marino warns that upgrading DragonFly from a version older than 3.4, to a version newer than 3.4, will require an intermediate step of going to 3.4 first.  e.g. If your machine is a DragonFly 3.0 system, you will need to upgrade to 3.4 before moving to, say, 3.6 once it is out.  This won’t matter for some months, since the next release is months off.

2 more GSoC projects: Hammer compression, System V IPC


Larisa Grigore posted an introduction of her Summer of Code project: Userland System V IPC in userland, and Daniel Flores wrote out his initial ideas for Hammer compression.  That’s the remaining two projects introduced.  If any of these interest you or you want to make suggestions, respond on the lists.  Work starts on the 17th.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

BSDCan 2013 videos


FreeBSDNews.net has a nice summary up of video from all (?) the presentations at BSDCan 2013.   Of particular interest to DragonFly users: a video about pkg, the tool used for package maintenance in dports.  In this presentation, it’s talking about use on FreeBSD, but the future stuff applies to DragonFly too.

Posted by     Categories: BSD, Conventions, DPorts, DragonFly     0 Comments

GSoC project: checkpointing vkernels


Pawel Dziepak has posted details on his Summer of Code project for DragonFly.  He will be making it possible to checkpoint vkernels, restoring network and console state.  He even has a public repository for his work set up.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Lazy Reading for 2013/06/09


Not as wordy this week, but still wordy.  And linky!

  • Max Headroom and the Strange World of Pseudo-CGI. A discussion of how old fake CGI can look better than modern, real CGI. This is an opinion I’ve had for quite a while, and my children pretty much ignore it every time I bring it up.  (via)
  • The Colby Walkmac, which predates the Mac Luggable.  Linked to because it includes good pictures of what the (external) hardware was like.  I find all the old ports interesting, since it’s all USB and the occasional eSATA these days… not that I’m complaining!  I’ve never had a good experience with a 9-pin serial port.  (via)
  • A brief education on escaping characters.
  • I get worried when remotely rebooting a server in a different town or even state.  In Praise of Celestial Mechanics covers much more stressful circumstances: interplanetary reboots.  Does Voyager 1 or 2 have an ‘uptime’ function?
  • The equivalent of what you are doing right now, 20 years ago.  I personally never got to see this; my experience was MUDs.  Speaking of which…
  • The Birth of MMOs: World of Warcraft’s debt to MUD.  MUD == MMO, Roguelike == Diablo/Torchlight, Doom == almost everything else.  There’s a number of game archetypes that haven’t changed in some time.  (via)
  • Playing with powerlines.  I used to work at a company that used these lines for data transfer.  It was neat technology, but it sure wasn’t easy to set up.  Imagine wiring a city but only being able to use Ethernet hubs.  Not switches, hubs.  That, combined with undersized ARP caches/MAC tables, made it really difficult.
  • OpenVPN on FreeBSD, which will come in handy for at least several readers, I’m sure, as the directions should apply to any BSD.
  • Is there anything DNS can’t be used for?  Cause now it’s domain-based mail policy publishing.  (via ferz on EFNet #dragonflybsd)
  • Have you tried DragonFly?” posts on various forums seem to pop up with some regularity.
  • Uses of tmux, explained.  A slide show talking about how tmux works.  (via)

Unrelated link of the week: I’ve had several deadlines and a mail server with issues this week at work, so this is all I got.

Adding to dports


Since dports uses FreeBSD ports as a base, adding something to FreeBSD ports means it will show in dports, too.  However, it doesn’t have to go that way.  It’s possible to have dports packages that exist only in dports.  If you have changes to a port that make it compile on DragonFly, that can be added too.  For all of that, go to the dports issues page on GitHub.

Another Summer of Code project: vkernels and hardware


Another DragonFly/Google Summer of Code project introduction is up: Mihai Carabas wrote out his project on developing hardware nested page table support for vkernels.  If Mihai’s name seems familiar, it’s because he was in Summer of Code for DragonFly last year, with a successful project.

 
Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

First Summer of Code description: Capsicum


Joris GIOVANNANGELI has posted a description of his Summer of Code project for DragonFly, implementing the Capsicum kernel APIs.  I expect the other students will post summaries soon, too.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     0 Comments

Full buildworld, not quickworld


If you are running DragonFly 3.5, make sure you do a full buildworld depending on how recent your version is.  Just a quickworld will cause problems.  DragonFly 3.4.x users are unaffected.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Heads Up!     0 Comments

Getting dports without pkg installed


I pointed out in my converting-to-dports post from yesterday that I had to download dports and build pkg by hand in order to install binary packages.  This was because my DragonFly system was upgraded from 3.2 to 3.4 and therefore didn’t have pkg installed.

John Marino has added a ‘pkg-bootstrap’ option to /usr/Makefile, for fixing exactly that problem.  It downloads a static version of pkg, which then lets you upgrade to the full pkg and install binaries as you’d expect.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly     0 Comments

Switching to dports software


I changed shiningsilence.com over from pkgsrc to dports over the last 48 hours or so.  Here’s how it went, in a series of bullet points:

  • I had to download dports source and build the pkg tool by hand; since this system was upgraded from DragonFly 3.2 to DragonFly 3.4, pkg wasn’t automatically present as it would be for a new installation.
  • I took the output of ‘pkg_info’ and culled it down to the applications I knew I used, and that formed my ‘to-install’ list for dports.  That worked in a very straightforward way.
  • It took so long mostly because of two things: I was also dealing with an email problem at my workplace, which usually took precedence.  Also, I had several applications that I had previously installed by hand and needed to reconfigure to work as a dports item.
  • Installing from binaries is really fast!  Really, the dports part of this was possibly the most brief.
  • The only thing I needed to compile from source was php, in order to get the Apache plugin.  I’m sort of surprised the option isn’t on by default.
  • Using ‘pkg search packagename’ is a good idea, because ‘pkg install’ can pick up multiple versions of a package.  e.g. ‘pkg install mysql-server’ selects mysql-server51, mysql-server55, and mysql-server56.  You probably don’t want to install all three.  Or even one, depending on your opinions.
  • Overall, it went more easily than I had expected, given it only had half of my attention.
Posted by     Categories: About This Site, DPorts, DragonFly     4 Comments

3.4.2 images uploaded


I finally got DragonFly 3.4.2 img/iso files uploaded, so they are available now or at least soon at your local mirror.  These are built using pkgsrc, so if you want dports, go for a snapshot image.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly, pkgsrc     0 Comments

Is anyone using KDE 3.5?


Are you using it and unable to upgrade to KDE4 for a specific reason other than aesthetic preference?  You should check this thread about support for 3.5, at least in dports.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly     0 Comments

More download statistics


There’s more download statistics on dports and pkgsrc packages, from Francois Tigeot.  There’s a heck of a lot of dports activity, though there’s probably much more pkgsrc building from source than this would report on.  So, not necessarily representative of actual numbers, but an interesting ratio none the less.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly, pkgsrc     0 Comments

DPorts and snapshots


Matthew Dillon and Sascha Wildner have converted snapshot/release building over to use dports instead of pkgsrc.  If you want to try one of those snapshots, look in the snapshots directory…  Oh, and here’s the mention of this on kernel@.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly, pkgsrc     0 Comments

More experimenting with dports


Here’s another “getting started with dports” article.  It runs through the basic range of commands, similar to my existing writeup – but much less verbose.

Posted by     Categories: DPorts, DragonFly     0 Comments

8-way benchmarks for DragonFly and Linux


Phoronix has another set of benchmarks that include DragonFly and PC-BSD, along with several Linux distributions.  It’s interesting to see, though don’t take them as performance measurements.  7-Zip as a benchmark doesn’t describe much other than the program itself, and the Himeno benchmark results are because of the compiler in use rather than any underlying performance aspect of the operating system – for instance.  The DragonFly benchmarks disappear after page 3.

Posted by     Categories: BSD, DragonFly, Goings-on     1 Comment

DragonFly 3.4.2 released


I’ve tagged DragonFly 3.4.2.  The major reasons for this point release were fixes for DragonFly under Xen with more than 2 CPUs specified, and for booting x86_64 DragonFly in KVM.  The 3.4.2 tagged commit has every detail.

If you’ve already got a working 3.4.1 installation, you don’t need to rush to upgrade; this is mostly for the people affected by the issues listed above.  I’m working on 3.4.2 install images; give that some time to complete and upload if you need one.

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Goings-on     1 Comment

DragonFly and Summer of Code 2013 projects announced


 

Here’s the accepted projects for DragonFly and Google Summer of Code 2013:

Like last year, we had more excellent proposals than we could accommodate with available slots and mentors.  We now enter the ‘community bonding’ period, so that students can get used to the DragonFly environment and make sure they have all the tools needed to perform work.  The work itself starts on June 17th.

Good luck to everyone involved!

Posted by     Categories: DragonFly, Google Summer of Code     1 Comment

Man page for dports


Sascha Wildner’s added a man page for dports.  Don’t forget the existing how-to page.

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SO_REUSEPORT turned on


SO_REUSEPORT has been added and turned on by Sepherosa Ziehau.  This is an implementation of a feature found in the Linux kernel.  Check the very lengthy commit message for a description of what it does.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly     0 Comments

DragonFly and GRUB, together


Rados?aw Szymczyszyn has manged to get support for DragonFly’s bootloader into GRUB.  This is part of his Master’s project to make DragonFly multiboot capable, at least for i386.

(I love having new things show up from new people, out of the blue.)

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Summer of Code status


We’re in the picking and choosing stage of Summer of Code.  I posted a note to kernel@ describing the next dates to watch for.

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Postgres still crazy fast on DragonFly


Loïc BLOT posted about his benchmark of several operating systems using KVM and Postgres 9.1.  Happily, DragonFly is the fastest, with one exception.  Linux/ext4 comes out faster – if you run it with barrier=0, which can be dangerous in a non-battery-backed-up volume.

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DPorts updates


New builds of dports have been uploaded and updated, for x86_64 and i386.  (x86_64 was already done; I linked the note about i386)  This means you can change PACKAGESITE in /usr/local/etc/pkg.conf to point at LATEST instead of RELEASE and get newer packages.  ‘pkg upgrade’ is all it takes, with dports.

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tpm(4) module added


The tpm(4) driver has been added by Sascha Wildner, ported from FreeBSD.  What’s it do?

From the man page: “The tpm driver provides support for various trusted platform modules (TPM) that can store cryptographic keys.” Crypto keys stored in hardware, where they are in theory unmangleable, instead of on the disk. At least, that’s my impression after 30 seconds of research.

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     1 Comment

More IP forwarding performance


Sepherosa Ziehau has posted some numbers showing improvements in ip forwarding rates.  He’s done this before, except this time it’s with bnx(4), probably because of his recent commits.

Posted by     Categories: Device support, DragonFly     0 Comments

More updates


This time it’s less and libedit, updated by John Marino.

Posted by     Categories: Committed Code, DragonFly     0 Comments